Understanding Why You Photograph / by Peter Grant

Grab a notebook and pen, turn your phone off, and put it in the corner of the room. Get rid of any distractions.

Now write.

Write about what you're trying to photograph. Write about why you're trying to photograph it. What are you trying to say? Why are you trying to say it?

My work is about all those people who work behind the scenes. Those under appreciated foke, who make the world go around. My reasoning is to make those who see my photographs think about all the work that goes on behind the scenes, running trains, fixing buses, or moving our TVs half way across the world.

My work is about all those people who work behind the scenes. Those under appreciated foke, who make the world go around. My reasoning is to make those who see my photographs think about all the work that goes on behind the scenes, running trains, fixing buses, or moving our TVs half way across the world.

In a culture like ours, which generally tries to please the consumer, the pains of the producer are kept well out of sight. The chef’s nightly anxiety over creating a dish is carefully hidden from the customers. The child does not know the level of effort, self doubt and worry that the parent contends with; we don’t think about the struggles going on in the cockpit, on the factory floor or in the boardroom.
— The Book Of Life, On Perfectionism

Now when someone asks, what are you doing, you can answer with conviction.